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Reply with quote  #31 

Regarding equipment. I usually carry two reels and two rods.  One heavy weight and the other lighter gear.  A plastic tray to hold and separate an assortment of hooks and sinkers.   A role of 15lb and 30lb line.  Two kinds of pliers, one needle nose and the other about 10 inches long to remove hooked fish that have swallowed my hook.  A small towel is also helpful if you want to set down your reel some where other than on the sand...a definite no,no.  Finally, a fillet knife and a stone with which to sharpen it.  All the lose gear is packed in what I call my fishing bag that has a shoulder strap.  Bring a bottle of water if its a hot day.

 

Did I forget anything?

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DonFromSLC

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Reply with quote  #32 

Yep, you forgot the Margarita!

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Reply with quote  #33 

Hello Margarita ville,, 

 

That is pretty first class on the sand.  I like a few brewskies in a big plastic baggie with ice.  Another fishing secret I did not want to disclose.  I offer free brewskies to other fisherman and they give me left over shrimp.  I'll give you my rod and reel for an ice cold margarita on the sand.

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DonFromSLC

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Reply with quote  #34 

Captivated

 

"U da man!"  My kind of fishin' buddy!  Are you ever around during Thanksgiving?  One of the really cool things about going to South Seas every year (for 20 years now) during the same two weeks is to see how different the fishing emphasis is each year.  Some years, it's snook, other years, redfish.  Sometimes the Jacks are in hot and heavy and others it is Lady Fish.  One year about five years ago, we got into schools of Spanish Mackerel just outside of Redfish Pass.  The other really cool thing is getting to know other fishermen, sharing bait and tips and great stories!

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DonFromSLC

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Reply with quote  #35 

OK, now for my 3rd and final Snook Story!  It was one day during Thanksgiving week about 4 years ago.  I had a perfect day and a perfect out going tide - only problem, no snook (or any other fish for that matter) along the rocks heading to Redfish Pass.  As I made my way slowly around the corner towards the Pass, I noticed a large number of guide boats circling around as the tide was going out and backwashing towards the Pass along the beach.  As I watched, I noticed that each time they made the float back in, they would hook up with a very large snook.  One boat after another!  All of the snook in the area were holding and feeding in this backwash.  I made my way there, armed only with my famous Love Lure (red headed jig with white body).  I then waded out towards the guide boats and began casting my lure.  I immediately began to hook up with one snook after another, the only problem being that they were all in the 18 to 22 inch range.  Great for catch and release but not good for cooking!  (Don't get me wrong, I am an avid catch and release fan, expect when it comes to snook and redfish - they taste too damn good!)  Anyway, each time a guide boat floated by, they would land a huge snook, in the range of 28 to 34 inches.  The difference, they were using pinfish.  All I needed was one big snook for dinner and then I was done for the day.  But no luck on my little lure, just small ones.  Then a person from a guide boat casted his pinfish about 10 feet up current from me and immediately a huge snook came up and hit the pinfish!  It did not eat it but just wounded it and knocked if off the hook.  As I stood there, the wounded pinfish struggled past me.  I then did what every desperate snook fisherman would do, I scooped it up, took off the white body of my jig and put the pinfish on the head.  I then casted my newly found pinfish into the current flow and immediately hooked up with a 34 inch snook, right in front of all of the guide boats (paying $450 per day) and I was using their bait!  I landed the fish on the beach and then enjoyed the best snook dinner I have ever had, gloating the whole time!

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kenzie

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Reply with quote  #36 

DonFromSLC,


 


Can not beat that story. Thanks.



This story broke me up at the time.  My friend and I were fishing off the rocks facing Pine Island, no tide and nothing happening.  No boats, no competition, dead water.  All of a sudden my friend thinks he is snagged, but no, fish on!  Probably a small snapper.  He brings it up and it is a 5-inch "blow fish".  My friend's name is Steve so he grabs the fish to retrieve the hook and return the fish to the water, when all of a sudden the Blow fish uttered this very audible sound...Steeeeeeeve



We both went to our knees laughing.

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DonFromSLC

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Reply with quote  #37 

That's a great story, kenzie!  I hate those blow fish, they are truly ugly!

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reebop

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Reply with quote  #38 
Great story Don. I love fishing towards the guides. One of these years I have to take it seriously and actually try and catch one. All mine are by mistake.
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kenzie

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Reply with quote  #39 

My best friend loved to eat snook, he also liked fishing but eating was more important.  Given that, there is a way to get the legal limit in an hour after sunset.  I will tell you the way, but I am not impressed with the sportsmanship.  Think commercial fishing for tuna.

 

First, get a strong deep-sea rod or pole that will take a very strong line...probably in the 100lb test area.  Secondly, have a good size, strong hook and large shrimp, pin fish or chunk of jack for bait and go to the T-Dock.  Now, walk to the right side of the "T" on the T-Dock, this is the area where guides fillet fish and throw the remains into the water.  The fish there are what I call "trash snook" that hang-out there all the time to feed off the scraps. They are very large snook, 20-40lb area. 

 

Throw your bait in the water, let a snook grab the bait and YANK it on to the pier.  Now go back and get your limit. 

 

Sorry, that was kind of disgusting but true.  No fun, but great dinner.  And extra snook for the freezer.

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kenzie

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Reply with quote  #40 

I'll be fishing in the rain and on the sand tomorrow, anybody want to play?  See you at the point.

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kenzie

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Reply with quote  #41 

This is more a be careful story than a fish story, but also a long story.

 

Couple years ago I was fishing at the point and a Pakistani was also fishing with me.  He offered me a lure as a friendly gift and bowed.  I offered him a live shrimp and also bowed.  We then went to hunt tigers.

 

He fished to my left on an incoming tide and let his hook drift to my legs and set his hook.  Ouch!  He reeled in and I said stop or die, he choose to stop.  I removed the barbed hook and bandaged as best I could. 

 

He thought that was funny, I thought, if I ever see you in me fishing arena again I'll drown you, and feed you to the sharks.  But that is not the story.

 

I'm continuing to bleed, big time, and can not stop it.  I continue to fish, because as my high school coach says everybody plays hurt.  Within minutes I have a big black swimmer with a fin coming at me and circling the wagons.  I exited the water like JC, and try to catch my breath on the sand. 

 

A young man and his young daughter came up to the point along side me and encouraged his daughter to play in the surf.  I said, I think there is a really big shark in the water and don't let your daughter go to far into the surf. He thought I was a typical fish guy, stay out of my water. 

 

Within seconds, the shark, maybe a 10 footer, came back almost to the serf line and swirled away.  The guy thanked me and said you fish guys really know what your doing! Yea, check the bloody leg.

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DonFromSLC

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Reply with quote  #42 

Ok , now the stories are getting really good!  I can't tell you how many times I have caught a glimpse of a smaller shark (4 to 5 feet) while wading along the beach.  Never felt threaten, but then again, I was never bleeding!  Of course, there was the time I was fishing along the beach with a big time trial lawyer.  Now there is a shark that really scares me!

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irisheyes

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Reply with quote  #43 

Three years ago, my grandson, then age 12 and his father and grandfather were out fishing with a guide and the 12 year old got a 10 ft. bull shark about 30 yards off the shore by Land's End. Fortunately, everyone had their cameras or it would just be another fish story.  Needless to say, he was a little hesitant about going in the water after seeing that "up close and personal".

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kenzie

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Reply with quote  #44 

DonFromSLC knows this but others may not. 

 

When fishing, think like a trout, (rainbow, brown, golden, or brook) makes no difference.  Fly Fishing for fresh water trout has tought me that snook, like fresh water trout have a very definite expended energy/reward ratio. 

 

Fresh water trout will not leave their rock or place of quite water unless there is a minimal expenditure of energy to do so. Snook think like trout.  They do not sit in the middle of a fast moving tide.  Sure there is a lot of bait there but the energy required to get to it is unrewarding.   

 

So, the point is this, picture a fast moving outgoing tide with you standing on the sand at the NNE point of Captiva.  Watch the water, as it turns to go out to Redfish Pass, it produces a backlash current.  Usually about 2-12 feet off the shore.  That water is moving in the opposite direction as the tide...AND THAT IS WHERE THE SNOOK ARE.  Zero energy expended and lots of food. 

 

Best to catch this kind of tide in early morning or near sunset but usually productive any time of day.

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DonFromSLC

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Reply with quote  #45 

Very astute, kenzie!  You are absolutely right!  Actually, that is pretty much what was happening in my story about the guide boats, just that the backwash was much bigger, thus many more snook holding there.  I do a lot of trout fishing in Utah and Idaho, and there are clearly defined spots were trout like to lay in hiding to snag a morsel of food as it floats by.  However, during a major hatch, like green drakes or salmon flies, all bets are off and the trout go crazy, gorging themselves and not worrying about expending energy.  The gain in food far out weighs what they expend.   

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