South Seas Island Resort Forum
Register  |   |   |  Calendar  |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 28      1   2   3   4   Next   »


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #1 

I do not brag, but I catch and release more snook than any person I know.  As they said in top gun, I am the "best of the best"  and, I am willing to help other fishermen, or women go for greatness.  This is the best sport on Captiva...go for it.   No amenity fees!

0
DonFromSLC

Registered:
Posts: 778
Reply with quote  #2 

With all due respect, Captivated, I am also the best snook fisherman that I know.  Of course, I don't know you and I don't see many snook caught during the Thanksgiving weeks that I am at South Seas (other than the ones I catch, of course!)  How about a friendly little contest for the best snook catch (or almost catch) story that has occurred as SSIR over the years?  You first! 

0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #3 

This is my best story, and I'm sticking to it.  Went to the T-dock 10:00 pm one evening with my best friend Peter McClash.  We threw out half pound chunks of fish on really big hooks as far out into the dark water as we could. With every cast we got zinged by a really big fish, probably a shark. At the end, neither of us had any line left.   Anyhow, we never landed our "catch" but had a lot of fun trying.  Go there, do it! 

0
reebop

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,510
Reply with quote  #4 
I am the worst snook fisherman on the island. I've probably caught 6 since 1996 and none over 2'. I've no idea what I'm doing and have caught them totally by accident, but they sure made my day!

I also catch and release. I'm not set up to do anything else and my wife hates fish. I use a small needle nose pliers and actually break the barb off my hook. I think I've lost all of 2 fish over the years because the "threw the hook" and it sure makes un-hooking them easier.
0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #5 

reebop,  You are probably a lot better snook fisherman than you claim.  Only a first class "real fisherman" uses barbless hooks.  I am going to start fishing for snook that way myself.  Fly fishing for trout is frequently mandated to be barbless and catch and release. I have over the years lost a lot of fish because of a poor knot or a ragged line damaged by the rocks but seldom due to a barbless hook. 

 

0
Susan

Registered:
Posts: 98
Reply with quote  #6 

Snook??  Is that all you catch?  Let me tell you MY best fishing story!  My husband is an avid fisherman and I usually go along for the "ride" and some sun, and to show support.  Many years ago ( 1995?) we hired a guide one day and went tarpon fishing in Boca Grande.  It happened to be the week-end of the annual tournament they have there in July.   The boats are all very close together and just keep moving up and down in the pass.  No one was catching anything.  My husband figured since the fish weren't biting he might as well let me try first so the guide had me cast in and we waited.  All of a sudden there is this tremendous jerk on my line!  So the guide hooks me up with one of those belts so I can try to reel this tarpon in.  I look up and directly across from our boat is Roland Martin and his crew is filming me and laughing the whole time because they figure I'm going to lose this fish.  You see, I'm a petite woman and the fish probably weighs almost as much as me!  Well, I'm happy to report that about 20 minutes later I get this tarpon along side the boat, so the guide can release it.  Everyone cheered.  No one was more proud than my husband (especially after he caught a fish bigger than mine) and Roland and crew caught none!

What do you think Captivated?  True story.

0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #7 

OK, lets get serious.  Snook is probably the best game fish in the world, it is also one of the best eating fish.  I spend more time fishing at Captiva than I do on the golf course or at the pool combined.  If you go to Captiva and don't fish you are missing a rare opportunity.

 

Lets start at the beginning. What do you wear?  Obviously, swim suit and tee shirt. Most importantly, sturdy sport sandals as you will be spending a lot of time in the water and need to have footwear which will not collect the sand.  You can fish without sandals but shells and rocks are a deterrent.  The bathing suit pockets should have a mesh lining and a Velcro closure so you can store a few shrimp in your pocket and they will stay alive while you are in the water.  It saves having to go back to your bucket every time you lose a shrimp. 

 

Polarized sunglasses, and unless your eyesight is 20/20 bifocals are a must so you can tie good  knots.  Because a snooks gills are like razor blades I carry a fishing glove (heavy duty and rubberized) makes landing and hook removal a lot easier.

 

Anyone have other thoughts or questions...post.

 

Next subject will be snook fishing equipment.

0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #8 

Susan, that is a great story and I really like the catch and release part, and the good sport husband you have.  I probably would have had a six-pack and cryed all the way back to port. 

Hope your guide took a scale from your fish so you could autograph and date your catch and have it immortalized at the Useppa Island Club.   Maybe that scale thing was just for Presidents, (Theodore) Roosevelt and his buddies.

 

This is the Captiva that LXR can not take away or charge an amenities fee.  "Memories are made of this".

0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #9 

DonFromSLC, 

 

Welcome your thoughts and advice as well as reebops.  Need input, I want to improve.  I'm really not the "best of the best", just a guy spending a lot of time on the sand, fishing and feeding Grey herons, pelicans and white egrets my leftover shrimp, provided they don't steel it first.

 

 

0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #10 

Susan,  I fish for anything that moves, redfish, sea trout, shark, sting ray, snapper, tarpon, sunshine girls etc, etc...snook, however is my specialty and my primary interest.  Like golden trout in California's high sierras, snook is the holy grail and it is the reason I am on the sand and why my ashes will be returned to The Point at Red Fish Pass provided there is no amenities fee to do that.  

0
Susan

Registered:
Posts: 98
Reply with quote  #11 

ah, my husband says there is nothing better than sitting on a boat out in the water with a fishing pole in one hand and a can of beer in the other.  He too, will fish for anything, or nothing.  You know what they say, a bad day on the water (or the golf course) is better than any good day at work!  We do fish a lot when at Captiva and I agree, LXR can't take that away from us and they can't charge an access fee to the Gulf, so we still have that!

BUt if you have to walk across their golf course to get to Redfish pass to spread your ashes you may have a problem there......

0
DonFromSLC

Registered:
Posts: 778
Reply with quote  #12 

OK, here is my entry in the SSIR Fish Story of the Year Contest!  Back in the "good old days" that is, in the years before Blackstone/LXR, probably even before Maristar, back before there was a Seabreeze, there was a light along the road to Lands End that was right next to the water, right by where the golf cart crossing is.  The really big snook would hang out around the light at night to catch bait fish.  Well, one night, after steaks on the grill and stocked with my evening Gin and Tonic, I walked down to the rocks by myself to cast my little "Love Lure" (yes, that is the name of a real lure!) under the light.  My favorite Love Lure is a red headed jig with a white plastic body.  After casting and jigging for about 5 minutes, I hooked into "something" really, really big!  Not sure what it was at that time but I knew it was really, really big!  - just hanging along the bottom and swimming around in circles.  All of a sudden, it took off running, heading directly to Pine Island, taking one huge leap after another until it took all of my line and broke me off!  I hustled back to 1322 at the South Seas Club to get my second rod and reel and my wife with my big landing net.  Now there was two of us sipping Gin and Tonics and enjoying a wonderful, warm, tropics-type evening under a full moon.  All of a sudden, I hooked into "something" really, really big again!  As it started its run to Pine Island, my wife stumbled to her feet, almost falling in, to grab the landing net!  I told her to "forget about it" and enjoy the ride.  Yet again, the fish made one big leap after another as it spun off all my line against my well set drag until, yep, it broke me off again.  Now, if I repeated this same story a third time, I'm sure you all would call be a damn liar, but it is true, it happened exactly that way a third time before I said "I give up, you all win!"  To this day, I am not sure if I was hooking into 35 to 40 pound snook or smaller tarpon, but whatever they were, they provided me with one of many great fishing memories I have of fishing off of the rocks, the T-dock and the beach at the "old Plantation." 

0
Susan

Registered:
Posts: 98
Reply with quote  #13 

Don, great story and sounds like tarpon to me! 

0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #14 

Great story, love it.  If it broke water it was probably a tarpon if not, a shark.  Could have been a large snook but I am thinking shark.

0


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #15 

This is a super secret for real fish people.  It is only available on the reebop site. Think 9:00-10:00 PM.  Think T-Dock.  Think strong outgoing tide. Look in the water with a flashlight and you will see several small iridescent lights looking up at you...that is a shrimp.  There will be thousands. The tide has pulled them away from their mangrove roots on the bay side and the strong tide is now taking them your way.  All you need is a small mesh net and the catch is yours...lunch, dinner or bait, I prefer the latter. 

0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.